Thursday, April 7, 2011

Polish Easter Placek.


Placek (plah-sek) in Polish just means cake, but placek around Buffalo (and probably other cities with a high Polish population) refers to a sweet yeast bread topped with sugary crumble, with or without golden raisins served on Easter.  It seems like paczki have found their way around the blog world fairly easily (I assume because everyone has an obsession with doughnuts and things cooked in hot oil), but you hardly see placek, which is a shame!  Placek dough is a unique combination of a fermented yeast sponge (warm milk, yeast, a bit of sugar and flour) combined with a creamed butter, sugar, flour and egg mixture. Even though I've made so many other bread recipes over the years, the smell of yeast still reminds me of placek - every year when my mom would bring out the biggest bowl in the kitchen, I knew it was time to make Easter placek.


Although the representation of yeast breads on this blog isn't much, I love working with yeast a great deal, but the problem with bread is that it makes quite a bit and stales quickly.  Around holidays this seems to be an easier issue to tackle since more people are around to eat things.  I know Easter isn't for a couple of weeks, but I think yeast breads can seem daunting to people so it might be easier to spread the workload over a few days.  This bread can also be wrapped well and frozen, then taken out as necessary for eating and giving away, meaning it can be made ahead of time!


Placek is the kind of bread that begs to be spread with butter - it's not like a moist sour cream coffee cake.  It has a drier crumb, making it an even better partner to coffee or tea.  Traditionally, my mom always added sliced almonds to the crumb topping and golden raisins to the bread dough but I've also seen recipes without them.  Either way, I'm proud to present this placek recipe - a true family tradition I can't imagine an Easter morning without!


Easter Placek
Sponge:
2 cups milk, around 105 degrees to 115 degrees F.
2 packages active dry yeast, or 5 teaspoons
1 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 cups of flour

In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm milk with the sugar and let stand until foamy, about 10 to 15 minutes.  Stir in the flour, then cover the bowl and let the sponge rise until doubled in size, 30 minutes to an hour.

Dough:
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 cups granulated sugar
6 large eggs, at room temperature
1 teaspoon salt
Dash of ground nutmeg
Zest of one orange or lemon
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 to 1 1/2 cups golden raisins

In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and sugar, then add the eggs in one at a time and beat until fluffy.  Add in the salt, nutmeg, zest and 2 cups of flour, then beat well.  When the sponge has risen, add that to the creamed mixture along with the last 2 cups of flour and the golden raisins, then knead or use the dough hook on a mixer for 5 minutes, until you have a very smooth, elastic, sticky dough.  Using greased hands, place the dough into a large greased or buttered bowl.  Cover the bowl and let the dough rise until doubled in size, an hour to 2 1/2 hours.  You can also refrigerate the dough at this point up to 3 days.  When you're ready to shape the loaves, let the dough come to room temperature first.

Crumble topping:
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
1 cup granulated sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 to 2 cups sliced almonds

Cut the butter into the sugar and flour until it's fully mixed in and crumbly, then stir in the almonds.

When the dough has risen, use greased or wet hands to remove portions of it and divide it among 4 greased 9x5" loaf pans (or mini loaf and cake pans, as I like to do.  My mom tended to do 1 9x5" and 2 9" cake pans, it doesn't really matter, use what works for you!)  Divide the crumb mixture over the loaves, pressing in lightly (you will almost definitely have some left over, I always do and you can see how much I use.)  Cover the pans, then let the dough rise until doubled or until they're almost risen to the top.  

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. and when the loaves have risen, bake for 30 to 45 minutes, until golden brown on top.  Let them cool on wire racks, then invert them and cool completely before wrapping and freezing or keeping airtight at room temperature.  I won't lie and say there's an easy way to get these out of the pan without all of the crumbs coming off, but that's why the crumb recipe makes so much! 


Enjoy sliced and slathered with butter :)

107 comments:

  1. Oh, that looks just delicious! Love the almond crumble topping.

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  2. They look awrsome. I love how you baked them in small pans. I love the crumbly topping.

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  3. So sweet, pretty and tender looking! I'm going to pass along to a Polish friend...thank you

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  4. OMGosh that looks so good. I am Italian heritage so the weekend was set aside for Pannetone but....there will be a batch of Placek going in the oven too:)

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  5. Growing up in a Polish family, I can honestly say I don't remember having placek, but now I wish we had! Maybe it's time for a new tradition!

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  6. You had me at the crumb topping. ;)

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  7. Wow ! That looks like heaven :) It looks absolutely delish
    http://kitchensojourn.blogspot.com

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  8. Wow! That just looks amazing. I will def try this bread. Love the sound of orange zest and raisins. Thanks for posting.

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  9. I am so honored to be on your blogroll! Your blog and photography is stellar....gorgeous. Excuse me, while I grab a bib and scroll through your recipes. This recipe is a great start!

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  10. Thank you so much for posting this in time for Easter. This recipe looks amazing and I will definitely be making it. I am always on the lookout for old Polish recipes--thank you so much!

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  11. Yum. This looks amazing. I ate tons of this when I was in Poland a few years ago. I am married to a Polish man and love trying Polish recipes to remind him of his Mama's cooking. Will be on the lookout for your future Polish posts (hint-hint, maybe a Makowiec at Xmas time...??) :)

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  12. There is a total of 6 cups of flour in the dough?? 2 in the starter and then another 4? I just finished making the dough and it was too loose...more like a thick batter and impossible to pick up with the hands. I ended up adding about another 2 cups of flour...it's still seems too sticky. It is rising now. I hope I don't have to throw it in the trash. :( I will post again when it's baked.

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  13. Chris, I've tried making a Makowiec recently actually and it didn't turn out well! Using some older recipes aren't that reliable all the time, but I've been looking for a better one.

    Joanne, it's a very sticky dough, I hope it will turn out okay for you! Better to add less flour than too much. Let me know how it works!

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  14. And to clarify: yes, there should be 6 cups of flour total in the dough. 2 in the sponge, then 4 added later. But 2 extra cups of it shouldn't be a big deal in the end! A lot of things can change a bread dough, including the humidity of where you live so if you felt the dough was intensely too sticky, 2 extra cups is fine.

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  15. 'Placek' actually means pancake in Polish :) Cake is 'ciasto'! Beautiful pictures, brings back memories for me too :)

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  16. Thank you for the correct definition, Anonymous! I appreciate it.

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  17. What an interesting and yummy recipe!

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  18. New follower (and Polish :-))here. Your placek seems like babka to me. In any case, I plan to bake it soon. I may make it for Easter and add it to the basket of things to be blessed.

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  19. I have never heard of placek before, but from your pictures and ur description, it sounds amazing! i love the crumble almond topping.

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  20. Verdict: The breads taste wonderful! They came out a bit on the dry side, but that's probably because of the extra flour. I might just try the recipe again as written and just pour the dough in the pans! Thanks :)

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  21. Joanne: Phew, I'm so glad! :) Thank you for trying the recipe!

    Carole: My mom always put placek and Easter egg bread in our basket to be blessed at church as well, what a nice memory :)

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  22. Thanks for sharing about the Easter Placek. I have never heard of that before but it looks delicious!

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  23. I'm back. I'm featuring your placek today in my "These Chicks Cooked" spotlight!

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  24. Just made the placek again, but this time with only the 6 cups of flour specified in the recipe, although I did pack those cups, rather than use the usual lighten, scoop, and sweep method of measuring I use for all my breads. Nevertheless, the "dough" still had to be poured into the pans. The resulting texture was more cake-like and moister, similar to a banana bread. I'm thinking I might prefer it somewhere in between. Still delicious, though! :) Can you describe what the texture of the bread should be like? Thanks!

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  25. I so love the scent of Placek in the house—we just made it last week, and my Polish grandmother's recipe is so close to this (no almonds or nutmeg, more citrus zest). I am definitely going to try adding the nutmeg to the next batch. Thank you for bringing back wonderful memories of Nana's house in Buffalo!

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  26. Joanne, I would say the dough should be something in between pourable and stiff, maybe in your baking environment the dough might require about 7 cups of flour? I'm honored you tried the recipe again!

    Frances, I love memories like that! Thanks so much for sharing, have a wonderful Easter :)

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    1. I must have done the same thing. I added 2+ cups of flour cause the dough didn't even pull away from the wall of the mixing bowl like the rest of my breads do.. The bread is delicious.. but falls apart when you cut it. I'm assuming it is because of the extra flour. Also, I used fresh yeast. Do you know how much fresh yeast should have been used? If I could just get the texture right.. I would be very happy with it.

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  27. I am coming over from Pioneer Woman. She featured you today on her website. I have a few Polish friends and I will make them this for Easter. Thanks for the recipe. :)

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  28. Just found you through The Pioneer Woman...had to click when I saw the picture - this looks delicious!

    And yay for Buffalo! I went to college at UB and loved my time there.

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  29. I'm Polish and my mother used to make something similar but referred to it as "babka". In any case I am glad to see another recipe for it because I am having difficulty replicating the one my Mum used to make-she has Alzheimers and no longer remembers how to make it. For those of you who want to make makowiec take a look at this website,
    http://www.homemade-cake-recipe.com/poppy-seed-strudel.html
    , written by a Polish lady living in Germany. I find her recipe is really excellent.
    Jan

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  30. I am Polish American and have never heard of this...looks yummy. I'll have to ask my mom and then we will have to make it for Easter.

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  31. Even my Polish husband was puzzled by the name - but demanded we try them immediately so he can compare the taste with his family food memories. Sounds good to me... I'm a breadaholic, no matter the ethnic origins.

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  32. All the women in my family get together and make this every Good Friday. I love Easter almost for this alone!!!!

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  33. Thanks to everyone who found this from Pioneer Woman's feature, I really truly appreciate the comments! This recipe means a lot to me and I hope everyone that tries it will let me know how it goes.

    Jan, thank you so much for that link, I've been looking for good reliable Polish recipe sites that have easy-to-understand translations for a long time, that's perfect! I can't wait to try out the makowiec.

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  34. I have never heard of these before but they look great!

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  35. The recipe sounds very tasty:)

    Placek refers to any desert with layers, usually inch or two high, depending on the number of layers. My grandmothers makes one with blueberries every summer (crust, layer of blueberries, whipped sweet egg whites and then topped with crumble crust).

    What you have is a 'babka' as other readers have stated, a sweet bread pastry similar to poundcake, but denser and less sweet.

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  36. Thanks for the information on that, Agnes, I appreciate it! I'm very curious to know where this placek got its name from since "cake" is "ciasto" and placek is a layered dessert. I'll have to see if my grandmother has any background information on it! I've always known this as placek and you can actually find a very similar recipe on Martha Stewart's site here: http://www.marthastewart.com/337590/placek

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  37. We grew up with placek too, and the Broadway Market in Buffalo. I'm from Niagara Falls and still love it. Wegman's actually makes a pretty good placek if you don't have time to make it. The more topping the better. I love it smeared with lots of good butter. Also good toasted. Great recipe!

    Love your blog!!

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  38. This looks wonderful! I found your site via The Pioneer Woman. I would have loved to have seen what the inside of the bread looks like, though. I can't quite picture what the consistency would look like...more like a cake or a bread or in-between the two? Still, looks scrumptious. I'll have to try it! Thanks for posting!

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  39. Anonymous, I used to work at Wegman's and I have to admit their placek was pretty good! Be warned though, it's not made in-house, haha. Agreed the more topping, the better :)

    Jan, the inside is a very tight crumb, but is a mix between a quickbread and a yeast bread. I'll try to remember to take some pictures of it when we devour the loaves this weekend! Thanks for stopping by, I really appreciate it!

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  40. Beth I just want to tell you that I was born & raised in a Buffalo suburb & still reside here. Placek is my all time favorite. Last year was the first time I actually made it. My mom is getting up there and she deciede that while she was still with us that I learn to bake this wonderful sweet bread. I will be spending the next few days baking one for every family member to take home with them on Sunday. Happy Easter to you & yours.

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  41. Aww, thank you so much for sharing your story Impalachick! Memories like that are what inspire me to share more recipes like this. Have a great Easter weekend! :)

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  42. I found you thanks to PW's post and I'm so glad. Growing up in Cheektowaga, Placek was a part of every Easter. Now I live many miles away, and I can't have my butter lamb, but I can make this thanks to you!

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  43. I am so pleased to find your placek recipe! I'am Polish and I will be making mine on Saturday, however, without crumble (I usually prefer with it but the one for Easter in my family is plain). If you have any problems with getting Polish recipes I will be happy to help you.

    PS Somebody said that "placek" in Polish is a pancake, not a cake, that is almost true (but only American kind of pancake, not a "crepe" which is "naleśnik" ;) but in some parts of Poland "placek" means "cake" as well. It is quite complicated, but I would say even in Poland it is fine to call your cake placek.

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  44. I hope you enjoy it, Kate! :)

    Thanks for the clarification, Karolina! I'll definitely let you know when I need a recipe translated - my grandma has a few I can't make out many of the measurements!

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  45. As others have said, this is almost exactly the same as my Babcia's babka recipe.... though we skip the nutmeg and orange and add cherry brandy instead. :)

    Time-intensive but definitely worth it. Also, I have always found it tastier on the second day than fresh out of the oven.

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  46. I'm a first generation Polish American (my parents immigrated to the US before I was born) and this is the one cake my dad knows how to make. He makes it without the crumb topping and with raisins. Seeing this recipe really made me smile since i won't be going home for Easter and it's nice seeing a reminder of home :)

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  47. It's very pretty! I've never eaten itbefore, but thi makes me want to try it out :)
    Thank you for sharing

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  48. Thanks for all the smiles and comments, everyone! I really appreciate it and I love reading all the memories :)

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  49. I am going to have to make this. Sounds delicious. You have a lovely blog, I will be following!

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  50. I was so delighted to see your recipe featured by Julie at Mommy Cooks! Some of my ancestors hailed from Poland, but we don't have any recipes that were passed down. I always relish an opportunity to try a recipe with my family that comes from one of our ancestral homelands! Thank you!!!

    New follower,
    Jenn/Rook No. 17

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  51. Making this as we speak -- I've never made any type of bread so hoping it comes out okay!

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  52. OK my dough isn't really rising that much... my sponge rose just fine... then the rise in the bowl with it all mixed together seemed okay.. but now that it's in the loaf pans with the topping it doesn't seem to be rising... I have the loaf pans in my grill outside, covered (it's about 50 degrees out)... how long should I wait? Thanks!

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  53. When they're in the pans, they need to rise until almost to the top of the pans before the final baking! Good luck!

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  54. Well mine didn't rise that much.. I waited probably almost 2 hours... They did rise a bit though.. I baked, cooled, and took out of the pan and they look pretty much like the pictures so maybe I should've made 3 loafs instead of 4. Either way we'll try it tomorrow and hopefully it's good :)

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  55. I've book marked this one - I'm another grew up in Buffalo but now live in Philly. My grandma lived a block from the Broadway market & I still dream of the trips there to get Easter supplies. But, I find there are many regional differences when it comes to foods, so I'm not surprised your recipe is reminding others of baba, my MIL is Polish but is amazed when I break out my traditions for Easter & Christmas Eve as she never really had any - other than knowing how to make halushki, which we called golumki (stuffed cabbage) & I had never had potato pierogi before I moved here (only cheese & saurkraut). BTW - my mom has taken to making "easy placek" using a yellow cake mix & adding a can of apple pie filling - still topping with the crumbs & baking in 2 bread pans.

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  56. Let me know how it turns out, Katie!

    Andigrif, it's always so interesting to me to hear about the differences between the Polish cultures of different cities. I figure as long as you know about galumki and placek, you're pretty good to go anyway :D

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  57. It came out great! Just had a piece with butter for breakfast. It didn't rise up as much as the loaves in the picture but overall I'm happy. I will definitely make this recipe again!

    Thanks!

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  58. Wow, I'm SO glad, Katie! :) Thanks for letting me know how it came out.

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  59. My mom (who is from Buffalo!) has been reminiscing about her mother's placek and I've been searching for a recipe so I can bake some up for Easter tomorrow. I'm so happy to have found your blog! I am a Southern Californian and people here don't know much about Polish food. I always have to get my fix when I am visiting family in Buffalo and Utica. Thanks for the authentic recipe.

    Michelle

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  60. I am making this right now, but only have enough for one 9 x5 pan and two smaller pans? Is that ok?

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  61. That's normal, Nicole! The pans I used were miniature-sized.

    Michelle, Polish food rocks, doesn't it? :)

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  62. This is exactly the type of cake I love--yeasted, so not too sweet, but importantly, still sweet enough. I wanted to do more Easter baking this year, but I guess there's no reason I can't still make it now!

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  63. http://coolbee.glasswolf.net/placek.jpg

    check it out! i halved the recipe and still ended up with 4 small loaves. granted, i had to add an extra 2C flour (!) in order to be able to knead the dough, but nonetheless, it was scrumptious! i'm doing another batch again today, but this time i will not knead it before the first rise in order to avoid adding so much flour. thank you for sharing the recipe :D

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  64. update: i still ended up adding extra flour to this batch because my dough was so sticky, but it turned out fabulous nonetheless! this time, i added about 1/2 tsp ginger to the dough (i only made 1/4 the recipe, mind you) and used the zest of a clementine. i omitted the nuts and added a pinch of cinnamon to the topping. yum!

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  65. coolbee: So glad to hear you put your own spin on the recipe :)

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  66. Hi everyone I'm from Poland:) Your blog is amasing! Beautiful pictures really:) "Placek" in my country is a kind of cake that everyone knows and like. But for Easter it is not a typical recipe. We rather bake 'babka'(cake baked in form with chimney it can by with yest or baking powder), 'mazurek' (witch is a shortcrust pastry with decotarion made of eg carmel, dry fruits, walnuts etc) 'sernik' is just a cheesecake. I also want to say that 'placek' is very often baked with fruits eg plums, Poles don't eat 'placek' with butter, and of course we make crumble on top:) Polish cuisine is very delicious and it is not fat and stodgy try it. I want to sorry for my mistakes in spelling, byt I don't speak English very well. greetings for you

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  67. Besides looking delicious, your photos are stunning! I'll have to try this, I love bread. My son-in-law lived in Poland for a couple of years, so I'll have to make it for him:)

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  68. Buffalo NY for the WIN! Im 24 ,my grandparents arent with us anymore. Its hard to find Placek that tastes like hers...Wegmans' is a joke and not even close. This year I will be going through recipes and trying to make it on my own....wow i miss German/Polska/Russian cooking...... :( Golabki I can maKe though.... the RIGHT WAY... if you have any good recipes send them to me! My name is Sarah and my email is Prettysnooky87@yahoo.com

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  69. what a wonderful blog
    and so beautifully photographed and composed
    of course it helps the placeks themselves are pretty as a picture
    i do with you could include pic of what it looks like SLICED
    im trying to approximate my late grammas recipe and hers was a bit drier and had more air bubbles than most i have had since she died in 1965
    also would be a great help if there was a printer friendly version of the recipe
    thx again for a joyous experience
    mike in cheektowaga
    alohamike@roadrunner.com

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  70. Forgive me but something just made me want to post her name on the internet - something she could not have even imagined (and would have been to shy to do herself)
    I Love and miss you, Grandma Esch
    Nee:

    VICTORIA SUPERCZYNSKI

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  71. Mike, I don't have a picture of the sliced bread, but this recipe is much drier and airy than most commercial placeks. Thanks for stopping by! :)

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  72. I lived in buffalo when I was a kid. I always remember going to the broadway market and everytime it was wall to wall people, it was the best place for your polish sausage, chocolate bunnies,horseradish,and butter lambs that my grandma would insist on having for the church blessing.. I loved the placek, the more crumb the better.. My dad would get the polish paper that came in the mail right around Easter, one year it had a recipe for Placek but it didn't have the yeast in it. I would appreciate it if anyone has this recipe or one similar. e-mail

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  73. Throughout my Polish recipe research, I've found that the placek known as "Swiateczny" tends to just be leavened with baking powder, or no yeast. Here are two you might want to try:

    http://www.polish-recipes.com/recipes.php/61/Polish-Placek-Swiateczny-Recipe/

    http://www.beliefnet.com/Love-Family/Recipes/2010/11/Buttermilk-Placek.aspx

    Let me know how they are if you make them! :)

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  74. line you pans with plastic wrap - it wont burn and you wont lose the toppings - I use it all the time.

    Mary

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  75. Brilliant, I love you! Was searching for my Godmother's Placek couldn't find the recipe. Then I found this through a link on Chow. Brilliant! It is perfect and the oven is preheating! Thank you ....can't wait to go through the rest of your pages!
    Kathie originally a Buffalo Gal stuck outside Rochester, NY

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  76. Awesome! Let me know how it turns out, Kathie :)

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  77. Thanks for the recipe. I have one from an older Polish lady but I am not sure were I put it . I decided to look one up because it would be faster and this one sounds just like the one from my friends polish grandmother.

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  78. Making it right now! It smells and looks wonderful, but I'm finding that I need a longer baking time with my loaves. Will keep you updated!

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    1. Oh, P.S. Rochester NY, born and bred! Missing Wojczak's, but Polska Chata is amazing!

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  79. I have tried to make this twice now, both in the same day. I cant get the yeast to sponge. Is there a secret that I missed? :) I am trying to make this for my Dad and I couldnt get my hands on my Grandmas recipie. This looks like the Easter bread she used to make. Any helpful hints are appreciated.

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    1. Is your house cold? I haven't made this but yeast is slower in colder temperatures. To speed things up you can try heating water in a microwave (just in a cup) and then with the microwave off, put the starter in and let it sit. It's sort of like a sauna for your starter and it will gently raise the temperature (but not too much) to activate your yeast more.

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    2. Cool, thank you for the tip...I think my Grandma used to get the towel hot then cover,now that you mention it. She has that on her Pierogi dough recipie at least...Will try that. Thank you!!

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  80. We ate all the placek we had bought from the Broadway Market and I decided we needed more for Easter morning, so I went looking and came across your recipe. The first loaf has turned out perfectly! My husband agrees it tastes almost exactly like the placek we get from the market. Thank you!

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  81. Placek rocks!!!! Mine just came out of the oven! Another Buffalo girl here who spent a lot of time as a child at The Broadway Market. Your recipe is what my family has always known as placek and we have had it every Easter for as long as I can remember. I'm the baker of it these days and was wondering if yours ever falls in the middle? Mine usually do, as did Grandmas and some at the Market do too, but they are still delicious!
    Tammy

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  82. Thanks, everyone, for keeping this recipe and memories alive! It means so much to me :)

    I was contacted a couple of times this past week about placek falling in the middle, I've never experienced it in loaf pan form, sometimes it happens with the ones I've baked in a 9" round cake pan, but I just assumed it was because I put too much crumble topping on ;)

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    1. I am experimenting with making this using frozen bread dough. I have the same problem with the middle sinking. I think the key is to put less dough in the pan. I put in about an inch or so, then the topping. Don't go overboard with too much topping. The sides tend to rise first sending the topping to the middle, the weight causing it to sink. This is still a work in progress. Thanks for keeping Polish recipes alive! My grandma was from Buffalo. I feel cheated that I missed that experience of growing up in a Polish neighborhood. I do recall going to the Broadway Market as a young girl when there were live chickens and thinking, cool, you can buy a real live chicken, not realizing it was going to be dinner that night!

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  83. Hello,

    I need help. My family is from Rochester and there was a torte cake that was made at Wojczaks bakery. I would like to know how to find out what happened to it and if the original owners still exist?

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  84. Thank you so much for the recipie. WE are from Buffalo, but in AZ at the moment. We are trying to move back, but it will take a while. It was so nice to see old recipies from "home". By MIL tried to mail us some of her Placek, but it didnt survive ?USPS :( . I am making this right now. so far every thing looks good, but I recomend using electric beater (i tried to do it by hand, and couldnt get the butter sugar eggs fluffy lol) also, for those that were asking, it is on the dry side by nature (not sure about this recipe) but thats why we COVER it with butter!! yum!! Thank you again.

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  85. Thank you so much for this!

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  86. I love Placek and it is amazing when made into French toast. Yummy!

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  87. I've made this 3 times since I can across this recipe a year ago. It is just like my Polish great aunt made. My whole family enjoys it. I get 4 huge loaves out of this recipe. Mine also falls in the middle but it still is delish! We will be heading to the Broadway Market next weekend but we won't be needing to pick up any placek lol...

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  88. Made this yesterday and it is so good. Mine sunk in the middle on some but not all. Nice texture and flavor. One one I thought that I would try something to get it out of the pan easier. I lined the pan with parchment long enough to have ends to grab and lift the bread out of the pan. I also sprayed the other sides of the pan. Worked pretty well, I was able to just lift the bread right out. This was the first time in making a yeast placek. Previously I had made buttermilk placek. Thanks for this recipe.

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  89. This recipe is a keeper. I made this last year for the first time and it was a big hit. My sister couldn't believe I actually made it, it was so good! So I'm going to make it again this Easter.

    I currently live in Florida and I really miss the food found in WNY. I made many trips to the Broadway Market over the years, especially during the holidays. Recipes like this help keep memories fresh in my mind. Thanks for sharing.

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  90. Thank you for posting the recipe. Grandma lost hers, and it's always been a family staple at the Easter table. Thank you!

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  91. I am also from Buffalo. This looks a lot like my Great Grandmother's. She would make it for Easter and Christmas every year. She made mini loaves for the kids which made us feel very special!

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  92. Both my neighbor and I made this recipe this year and we both ran into the same problem: The middle sinking. It tastes great, but doesn't look nearly as good as the pictures.

    One comment said to use less batter in each pan, we'll try that next time.

    Has anyone else had this issue? Any ideas?

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  94. wow, finally found some of the recipes of my youth. My baba always baked this on easter and other recipes as well. hoping to find them all, since she and my mother have past.

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  95. My great aunt used to make placek and give it out at Xmas. My parents love it and always talk about it. I am going to make some for them this Xmas and surprise them. I live in Cheektowaga and I am half Polish. I have a question for you. My parents loved my aunt's placek because if you were to drop it on the ground, it would sound like a brick. They loved it because it was so thick and dense (perfect for coffee). Is your recipe similar to that....like a brick? :)

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  96. Your photos brought me back to my childhood - my Polish babcia from Buffalo always made these at Easter. She would fly out to CA with 30 lbs. of kielbasa from Szelagowski (now gone, I believe, from Buffalo). Dough Texture was always an issue - some years, she made perfect airy placek that held up well for slicing, and other years, the dough didn't rise a lot (not sure why - too little or too much flour?) My sister and I and two nieces have attempted to bake this, with varying degrees of success. Only my daughter Natalie has successfully nailed it! I may try your recipe this year (2014) just to get that aroma from my childhood back into the house. Now if I could only get some beef on Weck in Oregon, life would be grand!

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  97. By the way, Baba Zosia called this "kuchen", but her family was from western Poland where the German influence was more pronounced.

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  98. Oh my I am just so excited for Easter Sunday and believe me, I already have 30 of Easter menu ideas from breakfast to lunch and dinner. These are also fun and yummy looking Easter recipes, but I sure will check on this recipe you share. Please allow me to pin on my Pinterest board? Thanks dear!
    http://meowchie.snydle.com/easter-recipes.html

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  99. Thankss for putting this recipe up here. I, too, live in the Buffalo, NY area, Lockport to be exact. But I'm Polish and always went to the Broadway Market with my mom. She's gone now, but I still go every year, usually only at holiday time. :)

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  100. Fucking polish food, You kidding us with that fucking shit.

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  101. I was just Googling for a streusel coffee cake recipe and I discovered this gorgeous bread!! I love to make bread and I will be making this ASAP. It is nowhere near Easter, but good bread is good bread. Thank you for posting this wonderful family gem and for sharing you memories.

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